When to use tail-log backups?

Recently a colleague of mine asked me about tail-log backups. I seldom used tail-log backups so I didn’t pay attention to this type of backup. After reading several blogs and articles, I want to share some of my findings on this type of backups. In most cases, under the full or bulk-logged recovery models, SQL Server 2005 and later versions require that you back up the tail of the log to capture the log records that have not yet been backed up. A log backup taken of the tail of the log just before a restore operation is called a tail-log backup.
 
SQL Server 2005 and later versions usually require that you take a tail-log backup before you start to restore a database. The tail-log backup prevents work loss and keeps the log chain intact. When you are recovering a database to the point of a failure, the tail-log backup is the last backup of interest in the recovery plan. If you cannot back up the tail of the log, you can recover a database only to the end of the last backup that was created before the failure.
 
Not all restore scenarios require a tail-log backup. You do not have to have a tail-log backup if the recovery point is contained in an earlier log backup, or if you are moving or replacing (overwriting) the database and do not need to restore it to a point of time after the most recent backup. Also, if the log files are damaged and a tail-log backup cannot be created, you must restore the database without using a tail-log backup. Any transactions committed after the latest log backup are lost.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: